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20130121
20130129
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are looking at this very seriously. >> you mentioned energy. people have talked about energy and shale and fracking before, but not like this year. you were there about a year in advance. your sense of how quickly this will happen? i will tell you, it's not built into the market at all. >> i think it's right not to be built into the market. one of the things that i wrote about in my book last year that i think it will kind of be overoptimistic about what the implications of the revolutions could be. could the united states be energy independent? that would be fantastic. but there are so many effects that people don't factor in. >> are you a believer, by the way, that oil could go down to $30 or $40 a barrel? >> no. no. >> somebody last night was making that observation. >> i do not believe that that is the case. in the past, i've woshgdz closely in oil and gas and i think those people are missing the structural implications. we're living in vary unique position. this is vary unique time in the history of the world in terms of population. the population pressure themselves i think will
-- not a fancy new title, but you're the under secretary of state for economic growth, energy, and the environment. that changed a year ago? >> yes, we tried to pull these together. increasingly what happens in the economy has an impact on the environment. environmental issues and energy issues are increasingly intertwined. >> always big in davos. and david cameron, it has an impact on the global economy if this were to go forward. the chances of it going forward i think are small. he has to get re-elected in 2015 to propose the up or down vote in 2017. it does put a cloud over the u.k. and e.u. a bit. >> the u.s. view has been not to get involved in u.s. politics. the u.s. view is that -- involved in u.k. politics. the u.s. view that a strong u.k. and e.u. is good for the u.k., for europe and the united states. we'll let the brits sort out their politics internally. that overall view is one we've been thinking. >> this f they were to cede -- if they were to cede, what would that mean? >> i think it's not wise to speculate about what would happen if certain eventualities were
starting in eastern texas and oklahoma. this is going to head eastward. a lot of wind energy for this system. a lot of wind damage will be our main concern. we've got the cold, the snow, the record warmth and severe. it's more like late march than january. >> eric, thank you. wow, we were just talking about this gentleman. i've heard of him. the name is familiar. but i can't place a face. house committee paul ryan, how do we know him? he was a nobody that came on squawk and became vice president and now it's squawk who? i go on network now. he was on all the time. >> every day .now he won't -- >> he's coming on soon if you shut up. i love him. please, paul, i guess i'm just hurt. anyway, he says that the automatic spending cuts postponed as part of the fiscal cliff deal will go into effect as scheduled in march. a former vice presidential candidate says the sequester, which would cut $1.2 million in domestic and defense spending over the next two years will happen since democrats haven't offered alternatives to gop proposals. but ryan says no one is tuking about allowing an a
. health care, tech and energy. right. why health care? because the golden days are gone. health care is going to have a tougher road ahead. decent sector but merck's not trying 20 times earnings any time soon. technology, there's revolution under way right and i think as a result you can make a bet on apple, google, et cetera, but there are reasons why they trade where they trade and so the world of 20 times multiples for large cap tech stocks will challenge as well. and energy, oil is at 100 not 20. >> but another revolution in energy too, right? >> but it's a bit of -- there's a lot of volume. not much profit. the market ultimately you can see why some of the sectors that drag multiple down are where they are. doesn't make it bad. but does it make me think that multiples just bottomed out? not so sure about that. >> yeah, you wonder whether you see multiple expansion in either one of those last two. in health care it's hard to -- it's going to be continuous cost pressure and then energy we just saw, climate change is the biggest thing that he talked about yesterday. i mean i wonder
've also shut down all their nuclear plants. so they have to import a lot of energy. and if they weaken the currency and energy prices go up, they're really going to kill their economy more. what do you see happening on that issue? i think that's the big issue for japan and the conundrum for them, if you will. >> maybe i can take a quick stab at this. i think if you have a country that has deflation, and inflation seems to me that by definition it means higher prices. and a weak yen means there's going to be higher import choices. but leading to higher domestic choices, as well. i think that's the hope. i don't know if they can deliver on that. the bank of japan and the japanese government are skeptical about how high inflation is going to go this year. i think of all japan's problems that they face right now, high inflation is not one of them. >> okay. i think, you know -- go ahead, carl. >> i think you look back here the past four years in the u.s., we've had a weak dollar and oil prices have gone from almost $40 back in 2009 to nearly $100 this year. so it's all about demand. and tha
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5